This Bottle Garden Hasn’t Been Watered In Over 40 Years

This Bottle Garden Hasn’t Been Watered In Over 40 Years

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In a beautiful example of a closed but functional ecosystem, David Latimer has grown a garden sealed inside of a giant glass bottle that he has only opened once since he started it almost 54 years ago.

Latimer planted the garden on Easter Sunday in 1960. He placed some compost and a quarter pint of water into a 10-gallon glass carboy and inserted a spiderwort sprout using wires. In 1972, he opened the garden again to add a bit of water. With that one exception, the garden has remained totally sealed – all it needs is plenty of sunlight!

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It might seem strange to some that a totally sealed garden would thrive like this, but it’s not – the garden is a perfectly self-sufficient ecosystem. The bacteria in the compost break down the dead plants and break down the oxygen given off by the plants, turning it into the carbon dioxide that the plants need to survive. The bottle is an excellent micro version of the earth as a whole.

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Here is how to make a terrarium from the ground up. Including some great do’s and don’t for terrarium care.

via

Earth Just Permanently Passed Climate Threshold

Earth Just Permanently Passed Climate Threshold

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Carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere stayed above 400 parts per million (ppm) during September—a time when CO2 levels typically hit the yearly low—raising fears that the planet has reached a point of no return.

“Concentrations will probably hover around 401 ppm over the next month as we sit near the annual low point. Brief excursions towards lower values are still possible but it already seems safe to conclude that we won’t be seeing a monthly value below 400 ppm this year—or ever again for the indefinite future,” Ralph Keeling, director of the CO2 program at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, wrote in a blog post.

The increase in CO2 levels runs parallel to a marked increase in global temperatures.

via ecowatch.com

Your Brain On Ayahuasca: The Hallucinogenic Drug

Your Brain On Ayahuasca: The Hallucinogenic Drug

Ayahuasca  is an entheogenic brew made out ofBanisteriopsis caapi vine and the Psychotria viridis leaf. The brew is used as a traditional spiritual medicine in ceremonies among the Indigenous peoples of Amazonia.

It can be mixed with the leaves of chacruna or chagropanga, dimethyltryptamine (DMT)-containing plant species. [via]

How does the popular new drug Ayahuasca affect your brain?