Museum of Tomorrow by Santiago Calatrava Opens

Museum of Tomorrow by Santiago Calatrava Opens

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The Museu do Amanhã (the Museum of Tomorrow), by Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava, featuring a skeletal roof that projects over a public plaza, has opened in Rio de Janeiro.

The museum holds 5,000 square metres (53,819 square feet) of exhibition space surrounded by a 7,600-square-metre (81,805 square feet) plaza on Guanabara Bay.

The architect Santiago Calatrava, said:

“The city of Rio de Janeiro is setting an example to the world of how to recover quality urban spaces through drastic intervention and the creation of cultural facilities such as the Museum of Tomorrow and the new Museum of Art.

The plaza creates a more cohesive urban space and reflects the neighbourhood’s greater transformation.”

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via: designboom

NASA Releases New High-Resolution Earthrise Image

NASA Releases New High-Resolution Earthrise Image

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NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) recently captured a unique view of Earth from the spacecraft’s vantage point in orbit around the moon.

“The image is simply stunning,” said Noah Petro, Deputy Project Scientist for LRO at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. “The image of the Earth evokes the famous ‘Blue Marble’ image taken by Astronaut Harrison Schmitt during Apollo 17, 43 years ago, which also showed Africa prominently in the picture.”

In this composite image we see Earth appear to rise over the lunar horizon from the viewpoint of the spacecraft, with the center of the Earth just off the coast of Liberia (at 4.04 degrees North, 12.44 degrees West). The large tan area in the upper right is the Sahara Desert, and just beyond is Saudi Arabia. The Atlantic and Pacific coasts of South America are visible to the left. On the moon, we get a glimpse of the crater Compton, which is located just beyond the eastern limb of the moon, on the lunar farside.

LRO was launched on June 18, 2009, and has collected a treasure trove of data with its seven powerful instruments, making an invaluable contribution to our knowledge about the moon. LRO experiences 12 earthrises every day; however the spacecraft is almost always busy imaging the lunar surface so only rarely does an opportunity arise such that its camera instrument can capture a view of Earth. Occasionally LRO points off into space to acquire observations of the extremely thin lunar atmosphere and perform instrument calibration measurements. During these movements sometimes Earth (and other planets) pass through the camera’s field of view and dramatic images such as the one shown here are acquired.

This image was composed from a series of images taken Oct. 12, when LRO was about 83 miles (134 kilometers) above the moon’s farside crater Compton. Capturing an image of the Earth and moon with LRO’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) instrument is a complicated task. First the spacecraft must be rolled to the side (in this case 67 degrees), then the spacecraft slews with the direction of travel to maximize the width of the lunar horizon in LROC’s Narrow Angle Camera image. All this takes place while LRO is traveling faster than 3,580 miles per hour (over 1,600 meters per second) relative to the lunar surface below the spacecraft!

The high-resolution Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) on LRO takes black-and-white images, while the lower resolution Wide Angle Camera (WAC) takes color images, so you might wonder how we got a high-resolution picture of the Earth in color. Since the spacecraft, Earth, and moon are all in motion, we had to do some special processing to create an image that represents the view of the Earth and moon at one particular time. The final Earth image contains both WAC and NAC information. WAC provides the color, and the NAC provides high-resolution detail.

“From the Earth, the daily moonrise and moonset are always inspiring moments,” said Mark Robinson of Arizona State University in Tempe, principal investigator for LROC. “However, lunar astronauts will see something very different: viewed from the lunar surface, the Earth never rises or sets. Since the moon is tidally locked, Earth is always in the same spot above the horizon, varying only a small amount with the slight wobble of the moon. The Earth may not move across the ‘sky’, but the view is not static. Future astronauts will see the continents rotate in and out of view and the ever-changing pattern of clouds will always catch one’s eye, at least on the nearside. The Earth is never visible from the farside; imagine a sky with no Earth or moon – what will farside explorers think with no Earth overhead?”

NASA’s first Earthrise image was taken with the Lunar Orbiter 1 spacecraft in 1966. Perhaps NASA’s most iconic Earthrise photo was taken by the crew of the Apollo 8 mission as the spacecraft entered lunar orbit on Christmas Eve Dec. 24, 1968. That evening, the astronauts — Commander Frank Borman, Command Module Pilot Jim Lovell, and Lunar Module Pilot William Anders — held a live broadcast from lunar orbit, in which they showed pictures of the Earth and moon as seen from their spacecraft. Said Lovell, “The vast loneliness is awe-inspiring and it makes you realize just what you have back there on Earth.”

Image Credit: NASA/Goddard/Arizona State University
More images and information from ASU’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera website

Source: NASA

10 Ways Ocean Pollution Makes Us Sick

10 Ways Ocean Pollution Makes Us Sick

Our oceans are very polluted and full of plastic. Roughly 8 million tons of plastic is dumped into the world’s oceans every year, and according to a new study, the majority of this wastecomes from just five countries: China, Indonesia, the Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam. Regardless of its source, plastic pollution has a devastating impact on marine life.

Check out this infographic from DIVE.in, an online scuba diving magazine, to learn how ocean pollution hurts us, too:

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Source: ecowatch

Depressing Artwork Portrays What Our Societies Have Become

Depressing Artwork Portrays What Our Societies Have Become

It’s not nice, but it’s certainly close to the mark…

Steve Cutts is a London-based illustrator and animator who uses powerful images to criticize the sad state of society. Greed, environmental destruction, junk food and TVconsumption, smartphone addiction and the exploitation of animals are all issues that have inspired his work.

Cutts worked in the corporate world before choosing to go freelance, and his vitriol for the rat race really shows (especially here…)

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Cutts used to work at an advertising agency with global brand clients including Coca Cola, Google, Reebok, Magners, Kellogg’s, Virgin, 3, Nokia, Sony, Bacardi and Toyota. It’s no surprise he was left with so many ideas for these thought-provoking images.

His illustrations capture all the stress, despair and frustration of our dog-eat-dog world, one in which we are persuaded to consume sh*t and destroy the planet in order to keep the corporate wheels turning.

It’s true that Cutts’s art is depressing, but only because his images are so close to the truth. Here is a selection of some of his best works:

Arrrgh! It’s Monday again

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Jessica and Roger relax at home

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The Fatcat

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‘Evolution’

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Dinner is served…

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A bull provides the daily news through a cleverly designed toilet-TV

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‘Circle of Life’

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Just another day in the office…

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This image in particular rings true for most of us

A very apt illustration of humanity’s ecocide

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Santa’s real workshop

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‘Scream Queen’

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A critique of consumerism

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‘The Trap’

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‘The King’

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‘The Final Handshake’, from his short animation ‘MAN’.

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‘MAN’

If you like Steve’s work, please share this article. You can also check out his websiteor like his facebook page.

Written by Sophie McAdam of www.trueactivist.com

This article (This Artwork Is Probably The Most Accurate (And Scary) Portrayal Of Modern Life We’ve Ever Seen) is free and open source. You have permission to republish this article under a Creative Commons license with attribution to the author and TrueActivist.com.

Russian Tourist Captures Incredible Moment A Giant Waterspout Twister Descends On Genoa

Russian Tourist Captures Incredible Moment A Giant Waterspout Twister Descends On Genoa

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Evgeny Drokov was vacationing with his family in Genoa, Italy, when, on their last morning, he captured this tornado (technically called a waterspout) on camera. Drokov was on his hotel balcony just 2 km (1.25 mi) away when he snapped these pictures.

“I’ve never seen anything like this before! It was a once-in-a-lifetime experience,” he said.

Source: Evgeny Drokov@flickr.com