All of the rivers in USA

All of the rivers in USA

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Can you imagine, these lines at the map are all the rivers in the U.S. of A! This map contains everything you need to make a vector based web map of American rivers in the 48 states.

The All of the rivers source code is open and there are three parts to the project: data preparation, HTTP serving of vector tiles, and clients that render maps.

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read more github

via kottke

Source: Worldlesstech

Linear gullies inside Russell Crater on Mars

Linear gullies inside Russell Crater on Mars

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona

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Several types of downhill flow features have been observed on Mars. This image from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter is an example of a type called “linear gullies.” Linear gullies are characterized by relatively constant width and by raised banks or levees along the sides. Unlike gullies caused by water-lubricated flows on Earth and possibly on Mars, they don’t have aprons of debris at the downhill end of the channel. The grooves shown here, on the side of a large sand dune inside Russell Crater, are the longest linear gullies known, extending almost 1.2 miles (2 kilometers) down this dune slope.

New research points to chunks of frozen carbon dioxide, commonly called “dry ice,” creating linear gullies by gliding down sandy slopes on cushions of carbon-dioxide gas sublimating from the dry ice. Linear gullies are on mid-latitude sandy slopes, where the ground is covered with carbon-dioxide frost in Martian winter. Before-and-after pairs of HiRISE images indicate that the linear gullies are formed during early spring. Some linear gullies — such as the ones in the magnified section of this image shown as Figure 1 — have pits at the downhill end that could be caused by a block of dry ice ending its slide and resting in place as it sublimates away.

This image is a portion of the HiRISE exposure catalogued as PSP_001440_1255, taken on Nov. 16, 2006, at 54.25 degrees south latitude, 12.92 degrees east longitude.

The University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory operates HiRISE, which was built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., Boulder, Colo. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, built the orbiter.

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Source: NASA

Star Forming Region NGC 3582

Star Forming Region NGC 3582

Image Credit & Copyright: Desert Hollow Observatory

Image Credit & Copyright: Desert Hollow Observatory

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Explanation: What’s happening in the NGC 3582 nebula? Bright stars and interesting molecules are forming. The complex nebula resides in the star forming region called RCW 57. Visible in this image are dense knots of dark interstellar dust, bright stars that have formed in the past few million years, fields of glowing hydrogen gas ionized by these stars, and great loops of gas expelled by dying stars. A detailed study of NGC 3582, also known as NGC 3584 and NGC 3576, uncovered at least 33 massive stars in the end stages of formation, and the clear presence of the complex carbon molecules known aspolycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). PAHs are thought to be created in the cooling gas of star forming regions, and their development in the Sun’s formation nebula five billion years ago may have been an important step in the development of life on Earth. The above image was taken at the Desert Hollow Observatory north of PhoenixArizonaUSA.

Image Credit & Copyright: Desert Hollow Observatory

Source: APOD

Four planet sunset in Kos Island

Four planet sunset in Kos Island

Image Credit & Copyright: Chris Kotsiopoulos (GreekSky)

Image Credit & Copyright: Chris Kotsiopoulos (GreekSky)

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Explanation: You can see four planets in this serene sunset image, created from a series of stacked digital exposures captured near dusk on May 25. The composite picture follows the trail of three of them, Jupiter, Venus, and Mercury (left to right) dropping toward the western horizon, gathered close in last month’s remarkable triple planetary conjunction. Similar in brightness to planet Mercury, the star Elnath(Beta Tauri) is also tracked across the scene, leaving its dotted trail still farther to the right. Of course, in the foreground are the still, shallow waters of Alikes salt lake, reflecting the striking colors of sunset over Kos Island, Greece, planet Earth. For now, Jupiter has wandered into the glare of the setting Sun, but Mercury and Venus remain low in the west at twilight.

Image Credit & Copyright: Chris Kotsiopoulos (GreekSky)

Source: APOD

China vs the US – Who’s more powerful

China vs the US – Who’s more powerful

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In this infographic from the Guardian, China vs the US, a comparison of the two superpowers, with data such as health, wealth and environmental development. How do the United States and China compare?

via popsci

Source: Worldlesstech

Underwater photograph of the Year

Underwater photograph of the Year

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For the 2013 Annual Underwater Photography Contest hosted by the University of Miami, more than 650 underwater images were submitted from 23 countries.   

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First place in the “Macro” category of the Underwater Photography Contest, Beth Watson’s photo of an anemone shrimp in the waters off Puerto Galera in the Philippines.

 

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The second place macro picture by Pennsylvania photographer Douglas Good, was this image of an emperor shrimp sat on top of two nudibranch molluscs.

 

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In the third place of “Macro” category, a porcelain crab (Neopetrolisthes maculatus) on an anemone at Pescador Island in the Philippines, by Italy’s Frederica Bambi.

 

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The winner of the first place in the “Fish or Marine Life Portrait” category, a juvenile lionfish by Florida photographer Steven Kovacsis, captured on his camera during a night dive in Roatan, Honduras.

 

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The picture of a male banded jawfish shows off his clutch of eggs at the Blue Heron Bridge in Riviera Beach, by Florida’s Judy Townsend, won third place in the “Fish or Marine Life Portrait” category.

 

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The second place in the “Wide Angle” category, dolphins swiming in a small inlet off Hawaii’s Kona Coast, by New York photographer Joseph Tepper.

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via dailymail

Source: Worldlesstech