Auroras Larger Than Earth Spotted Over Jupiter

Auroras Larger Than Earth Spotted Over Jupiter

auroras-bigger-than-earth-spotted-over-jupiter

Astronomers are using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope to study auroras — stunning light shows in a planet’s atmosphere — on the poles of the largest planet in the Solar System, Jupiter. This observation programme is supported by measurements made by NASA’s Juno spacecraft, currently on its way to Jupiter.

Jupiter, the largest planet in the Solar System, is best known for its colourful storms, the most famous being the Great Red Spot. Now astronomers have focused on another beautiful feature of the planet, using the ultraviolet capabilities of the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope.

The extraordinary vivid glows shown in the new observations are known as auroras. They are created when high energy particles enter a planet’s atmosphere near its magnetic poles and collide with atoms of gas. As well as producing beautiful images, this programme aims to determine how various components of Jupiter’s auroras respond to different conditions in the solar wind, a stream of charged particles ejected from the Sun.

This observation programme is perfectly timed as NASA’s Juno spacecraft is currently in the solar wind near Jupiter and will enter the orbit of the planet in early July 2016. While Hubble is observing and measuring the auroras on Jupiter, Juno is measuring the properties of the solar wind itself; a perfect collaboration between a telescope and a space probe.

To highlight changes in the auroras Hubble is observing Jupiter daily for around one month. Using this series of images it is possible for scientists to create videos that demonstrate the movement of the vivid auroras, which cover areas bigger than the Earth.

Not only are the auroras huge, they are also hundreds of times more energetic than auroras on Earth. And, unlike those on Earth, they never cease. Whilst on Earth the most intense auroras are caused by solar storms — when charged particles rain down on the upper atmosphere, excite gases, and cause them to glow red, green and purple — Jupiter has an additional source for its auroras.

The strong magnetic field of the gas giant grabs charged particles from its surroundings. This includes not only the charged particles within the solar wind but also the particles thrown into space by its orbiting moon Io, known for its numerous and large volcanos.

Jupiter’s auroras were first discovered by the Voyager 1 spacecraft in 1979. A thin ring of light on Jupiter’s nightside looked like a stretched-out version of our own auroras on Earth. Only later on was it discovered that the auroras were best visible in the ultraviolet.

The Hubble Space Telescope is a project of international cooperation between ESA and NASA.

Auroras and Star Trails over Iceland

Auroras and Star Trails over Iceland

LakeMyvatn_Brady_1080

It was one of the quietest nights of aurora in weeks. Even so, in northern- Iceland during last November, faint auroras lit up the sky every clear night.

The featured 360-degree panorama is the digital fusion of four wide-angle cameras each simultaneously taking 101 shots over 42 minutes.

In the foreground is serene Lake Myvatn dotted with picturesque rock formations left over from ancient lava flows. Low green auroras sweep across the sky above showing impressive complexity near the horizon. Stars far in the distance appear to show unusual trails — as the Earth turned — because early exposures were artificially faded.

Image Credit & Copyright: Vincent Brady

Source: APOD

Aurora over Maine

Aurora over Maine

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It has been a good week for auroras. Earlier this month active sunspot region 2158 rotated into view and unleashed a series of flares and plasma ejections into the Solar System during its journey across the Sun’s disk.

In particular, a pair of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) impacted the Earth’s magnetosphere toward the end of last week, creating the most intense geomagnetic storm so far this year. Although power outages were feared by some, the most dramatic effects of these impacting plasma clouds were auroras seen as far south as Wisconsin, USA.

In the featured image taken last Friday night, rays and sheets of multicolored auroras were captured over Acadia National Park, in Maine, USA. Since another CME plasma cloud is currently approaching the Earth, tonight offers another good chance to see an impressive auroral display.

Image Credit & Copyright: Jeremy P. Gray
Almost Hyperspace: Random APOD Generator

Source: APOD

25 Awe-Inspiring Reminders Of Just How Insignificant We Are:Prepare to feel tiny.

25 Awe-Inspiring Reminders Of Just How Insignificant We Are:Prepare to feel tiny.

One billion stars


Source: Mike Read (WFAU), UKIDSS/GPS and VVV / via: ph.ed.ac.uk

 

New view of the blue marble

Source: nasa.gov

Furthest-ever image of the universe

Source: nasa.gov

9 billion pixels of the Milky Way galaxy

Source: eso.org

The view 50 million light years away

Source: Adam Block / via: skycenter.arizona.edu

Panorama of Mars

Source: 360cities.net

A not-so-dark “dark core”

Source: nasa.gov

A twister on Mars

Source: nasa.gov

Saturns storms

Source: apod.nasa.gov

European panorma at night from the International Space Station

Source: spaceflight.nasa.gov

 

 

The “UFO galaxy”

Source: nasa.gov

 

Groundhog day on Mars

Source: nasa.gov

The Moon and the Milky Way

Source: eso.org

Thor’s Helmet revisited

Source: eso.org

Enterprise flying over NYC


Source: nasa.gov

Janus, one of Saturn’s creepy moons

Source: nasa.gov

The Pencil nebula

Source: eso.org

Coronal hole on the Sun

Source: nasa.gov

The slow death of R Sculptoris


Source: eso.org

Transit of Venus


Source: Greg Scheiderer / via: seattleastronomy.com

Transit of Venus up close

Source: nasa.gov

 
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As seen on Buzzfeed.com

Credit: Nasa.gov
Eso.org