Your Words May Predict Your Future Mental Health

Your Words May Predict Your Future Mental Health

Can the way you speak and write today predict your future mental state, even the onset of psychosis?

In this fascinating talk, neuroscientist Mariano Sigman reflects on ancient Greece and the origins of introspection to investigate how our words hint at our inner lives and details a word-mapping algorithm that could predict the development of schizophrenia.

“We may be seeing in the future a very different form of mental health,” Sigman says, “based on objective, quantitative and automated analysis of the words we write, of the words we say.”

7 Talks To Make You Love Science

7 Talks To Make You Love Science

Science is about discovering the wonders of how our world works.

From physics to biology to neuroscience, here are seven talks to make you love science.

1. Suicidal crickets, zombie roaches and other parasite tales


We humans set a premium on our own free will and independence … and yet there’s a shadowy influence we might not be considering. As science writer Ed Yong explains in this fascinating, hilarious and disturbing talk, parasites have perfected the art of manipulation to an incredible degree. So are they influencing us? It’s more than likely.


 

2. What is so special about the human brain?

The human brain is puzzling — it is curiously large given the size of our bodies, uses a tremendous amount of energy for its weight and has a bizarrely dense cerebral cortex. But: why? Neuroscientist Suzana Herculano-Houzel puts on her detective’s cap and leads us through this mystery. By making “brain soup,” she arrives at a startling conclusion.


 

3. The weird, wonderful world of bioluminescence

In the deep, dark ocean, many sea creatures make their own light for hunting, mating and self-defense. Bioluminescence expert Edith Widder was one of the first to film this glimmering world. At TED2011, she brings some of her glowing friends onstage, and shows more astonishing footage of glowing undersea life.


 

4. Psychedelic science

Swiss artist and photographer Fabian Oefner is on a mission to make eye-catching art from everyday science. In this charming talk, he shows off some recent psychedelic images, including photographs of crystals as they interact with soundwaves. And, in a live demo, he shows what really happens when you mix paint with magnetic liquid—or when you set fire to whiskey.


 

5. The birds and the bees are just the beginning

Think you know a thing or two about sex? Think again. In this fascinating talk, biologist Carin Bondar lays out the surprising science behind how animals get it on. (This talk describes explicit and aggressive sexual content.)


 

6. Is our universe the only universe?

Is there more than one universe? In this visually rich, action-packed talk, Brian Greene shows how the unanswered questions of physics (starting with a big one: What caused the Big Bang?) have led to the theory that our own universe is just one of many in the “multiverse.”


 

7. Swim with the giant sunfish

Marine biologist Tierney Thys asks us to step into the water to visit the world of the Mola mola, or giant ocean sunfish. Basking, eating jellyfish and getting massages, this behemoth offers clues to life in the open sea.

The Hunt For “Unexpected Genetic Heroes”

The Hunt For “Unexpected Genetic Heroes”

What can we learn from people with the genetics to get sick — who don’t? With most inherited diseases, only some family members will develop the disease, while others who carry the same genetic risks dodge it. Stephen Friend suggests we start studying those family members who stay healthy.

Hear about the Resilience Project, a massive effort to collect genetic materials that may help decode inherited disorders.

The Smelly Mystery Of The Human Pheromone

The Smelly Mystery Of The Human Pheromone

Do our smells make us sexy?

Popular science suggests yes — pheromones send chemical signals about sex and attraction from our armpits. But, despite what you might have heard, there is no conclusive research confirming that humans have these smell molecules. In this eye-opening talk, zoologist Tristram Wyatt explains the fundamental flaws in current pheromone research, and shares his hope for a future that unlocks the fascinating, potentially life-saving knowledge tied up in our scent.

Autism — What We Know And What We Don’t Know Yet

Autism — What We Know And What We Don’t Know Yet

In this calm and factual talk, geneticist Wendy Chung shares what we know about autism spectrum disorder — for example, that autism has multiple, perhaps interlocking, causes. Looking beyond the worry and concern that can surround a diagnosis, Chung and her team look at what we’ve learned through studies, treatments and careful listening.