A 24 Hour Arctic Timelapse Where the Sun Never Sets

A 24 Hour Arctic Timelapse Where the Sun Never Sets

Arctic Midnight Sun – 24hour timelapse (made with Olympus OMD E-M1 + Zuiko Digital 8 mm f/3.5 ED FISHEYE) from Witek Kaszkin on Vimeo.

The polar regions are called the “lands of the midnight sun” because in the summer, the sun never sets. 

This timelapse was filmed by Witek Kaszkin using an Olympus OMD E-M1 + Zuiko Digital 8 mm f/3.5 ED fisheye lens. The audio is “Hornsund (Earthtones)” by Bill Stankay.

You can learn more about the midnight sun here.

Auroras Larger Than Earth Spotted Over Jupiter

Auroras Larger Than Earth Spotted Over Jupiter

auroras-bigger-than-earth-spotted-over-jupiter

Astronomers are using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope to study auroras — stunning light shows in a planet’s atmosphere — on the poles of the largest planet in the Solar System, Jupiter. This observation programme is supported by measurements made by NASA’s Juno spacecraft, currently on its way to Jupiter.

Jupiter, the largest planet in the Solar System, is best known for its colourful storms, the most famous being the Great Red Spot. Now astronomers have focused on another beautiful feature of the planet, using the ultraviolet capabilities of the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope.

The extraordinary vivid glows shown in the new observations are known as auroras. They are created when high energy particles enter a planet’s atmosphere near its magnetic poles and collide with atoms of gas. As well as producing beautiful images, this programme aims to determine how various components of Jupiter’s auroras respond to different conditions in the solar wind, a stream of charged particles ejected from the Sun.

This observation programme is perfectly timed as NASA’s Juno spacecraft is currently in the solar wind near Jupiter and will enter the orbit of the planet in early July 2016. While Hubble is observing and measuring the auroras on Jupiter, Juno is measuring the properties of the solar wind itself; a perfect collaboration between a telescope and a space probe.

To highlight changes in the auroras Hubble is observing Jupiter daily for around one month. Using this series of images it is possible for scientists to create videos that demonstrate the movement of the vivid auroras, which cover areas bigger than the Earth.

Not only are the auroras huge, they are also hundreds of times more energetic than auroras on Earth. And, unlike those on Earth, they never cease. Whilst on Earth the most intense auroras are caused by solar storms — when charged particles rain down on the upper atmosphere, excite gases, and cause them to glow red, green and purple — Jupiter has an additional source for its auroras.

The strong magnetic field of the gas giant grabs charged particles from its surroundings. This includes not only the charged particles within the solar wind but also the particles thrown into space by its orbiting moon Io, known for its numerous and large volcanos.

Jupiter’s auroras were first discovered by the Voyager 1 spacecraft in 1979. A thin ring of light on Jupiter’s nightside looked like a stretched-out version of our own auroras on Earth. Only later on was it discovered that the auroras were best visible in the ultraviolet.

The Hubble Space Telescope is a project of international cooperation between ESA and NASA.

NASA Make Mesmerizing 4K Video of The Sun

NASA Make Mesmerizing 4K Video of The Sun

This really is the most detailed look we can have at our Sun.

It’s always shining, always ablaze with light and energy that drive weather, biology and more. In addition to keeping life alive on Earth, the sun also sends out a constant flow of particles called the solar wind, and it occasionally erupts with giant clouds of solar material, called coronal mass ejections, or explosions of X-rays called solar flares.

These events can rattle our space environment out to the very edges of our solar system. In space, NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, keeps an eye on our nearest star 24/7. SDO captures images of the sun in 10 different wavelengths, each of which helps highlight a different temperature of solar material. In this video, we experience SDO images of the sun in unprecedented detail.

Presented in ultra-high definition, the video presents the dance of the ultra-hot material on our life-giving star in extraordinary detail, offering an intimate view of the grand forces of the solar system. 

Are you on Aweditoria? Aweditoria is a new social media platform where people share small stories and ideas based on interests. Focusing on, personal development, health, politics, science, technology and etc. No distractions, just pure knowledge, it is free to use and it only takes few seconds to join, click here. You can follow Myscienceacademy.org there as well.

Are you on Aweditoria? Aweditoria is a new social media platform where people share small stories and ideas based on interests. Focusing on, personal development, health, politics, science, technology and etc. No distractions, just pure knowledge, it is free to use and it only takes few seconds to join, click here. You can follow Myscienceacademy.org there as well.

Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

Earth Timelapse 2014

Earth Timelapse 2014

Watch Earth roll by through the perspective of ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst in this six-minute amazing timelapse video from space.

Combining 12 500 images taken by Alexander during his six-month Blue Dot mission on the International Space Station this Ultra High Definition video shows the best our beautiful planet has to offer.

Source: ESA