600 Reasons Turmeric May Be The World’s Most Important Herb

600 Reasons Turmeric May Be The World’s Most Important Herb

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There is a medicinal spice so timelessly interwoven with the origins of human culture and metabolism, so thoroughly supported by modern scientific inquiry, as to be unparalleled in its proven value to human health and well-being.

Indeed, turmeric turns the entire drug-based medical model on its head.  Instead of causing far more side effects than therapeutic ones, as is the case for most patented pharmaceutical medications, turmeric possesses hundreds of potential side benefits, having been empirically demonstrated to positively modulate over 160 different physiological pathways in the mammalian body.

While no food or herb is right for everyone, and everything has the potential for unintended, adverse side effects, turmeric is truly unique in its exceptionally high margin of safety vis-à-vis the drugs it has been compared with, e.g. hydrocortisone, ibuprofen, chemotherapy agents. Furthermore, nothing within the modern-day pharmaceutical armamentarium comes even remotely close to turmeric’s 6,000 year track record of safe use in Ayurvedic medicine.[1]

Despite its vast potential for alleviating human suffering, turmeric will likely never receive the FDA stamp of approval, due to its lack of exclusivity, patentability and therefore profitability. Truth be told, the FDA’s “gold standard” for proving the value of a prospective medicinal substance betrays the age old aphorism: “he who owns the gold makes the rules,” and unless an investor is willing to risk losing the 800+ million dollars that must be spent upfront, the FDA-required multi-phased double-blind, randomized clinical trials will not occur. For additional details on this rather seedy arrangement read our article on the topic: Why The Law Forbids The Medicinal Use of Natural Substances.

Here at GreenMedInfo.com, we have reviewed over 5,000 study abstracts from the National Library of Medicine’s bibliographic database known as MEDLINE and have discovered over 600 potential health benefits of turmeric, and/or its primary polyphenol known as curcumin. These can be viewed on our turmeric research page which is dedicated to disseminating the research on the topic to a larger audience.

Some of the most amazing demonstrated properties include:

Again, what is so amazing is not that turmeric may have value in dozens of health conditions simultaneously, or that it may improve conditions that are completely resistant to conventional treatment, but that there are over six hundred additional health conditions it may also be valuable in preventing and/or treating. Consider also the fact that turmeric grows freely on the Earth, and you will understand why its very existence threatens billions of dollars in pharmaceutical industry revenue.

Learn more about this research in the video below (keeping in mind that it is several years old and needing some updating), and please spread the information to others who may benefit from learning more on the topic

 

 

[1] The Genus Curcuma (Medicinal and Aromatic Plants – Industrial Profiles); CRC; March 2007
Study Combines Turmeric with Big Pharma Drug to Kill Cancer Cells

Study Combines Turmeric with Big Pharma Drug to Kill Cancer Cells

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According to Medical News Today, a new study paired turmeric with the anti-nausea drug thalidomide. Together, the two products were able to create “hybrid molecules” to kill multiple myeloma cancer cells.

“Although thalidomide disturbs the microenvironment of tumor cells in bone marrow, it disintegrates in the body. Curcumin, also active against cancers, is limited by its poor water solubility. But the combination of thalidomide and curcumin in the hybrid molecules enhances both the cytotoxicity and solubility,” says the study’s author Shijun Zhang, of the Department of Medicinal Chemistry at the VCU School of Pharmacy.

This is good news, right? Multiple myeloma is the cancer of plasma cells. It’s relatively uncommon and has a survival rate of about 45% 5-years after diagnosis. Finding a solution for this cancer would be ideal, of course. But the new study may not be “all good”.

Anti-nausea drug thalidomide was taken off the market in 1962. It was initially approved in the 1950s, but was removed when it was found to carry the risk of “severe, life-threatening birth defects.” In the late 1990s, it was resurrected as a treatment for multiple myeloma. It still carries frightening warning labels and advisories despite its use.

On the other hand, turmeric is a completely harmless root. It’s used as a spice in eastern cuisine and has a long history of medicinal use. Check out this health benefits of turmeric article or search “turmeric” on NaturalSociety for more information.

Coincidentally, this isn’t the first study to link turmeric to effective treatment of various forms of cancer. As Anthony Gucciardi reported a few years ago, researchers from UCLA found that curcumin was able to actually block the growth of head and neck cancer cells with a simple supplement of 1,000 mg provided twice daily. In 2012, Gucciardi reported on another study linking curcumin and the slowed-growth of prostate cancer cells.

There is ample evidence that turmeric and its active component curcumin could hold the key to cancer prevention and possibly even effective treatment. But when researchers suggest it must be combined with a dangerous drug to be effective, it’s not rash to be suspicious.

When a food with radical medical potential begins to gain ground in the scientific community, it seems something always happens to bring conventional pharmaceuticals back into the circle. And with a new study from Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center, it appears that’s what may be happening to turmeric.

 

Turmeric May Equal Exercise In Heart Health Benefits

Turmeric May Equal Exercise In Heart Health Benefits

4405785669_188825f382_z by MARCO TORRES,

Curcumin, the powerful antioxidant of the popular Indian spice Turmeric, may benefit cardiovascular health to the same extent as exercise, says new data from a clinical trial from Japan.
Phytochemicals found in turmeric have been investigated in preliminary research for their beneficial effects on diseases, such as cancer, arthritis, and other clinical disorders

Previous research has shown that daily supplements of curcumin combined with diet and exercise strategies could be associated with more than a 60% reduction in triglyceride levels, a reduction known impossible through pharmaceutical intervention alone.

Powdered turmeric has been used for centuries to treat a host of illnesses. It inhibits inflammatory reactions, has anti-diabetic effects, reduces cholesterol among other powerful health effects. A recent study led by a research team in Munich showed that it can also inhibit formation of metastases.

May Match Exercise in Cardiovascular Health Benefits

Vascular health, as measured by flow-mediated dilation (FMD), improved equally in groups of women receiving the curcumin supplements and those receiving aerobic exercise training, according to findings published in Nutrition Research .

A recent study in the British Journal of Nutrition indicated that decreased FMD is reported to be a predictor of future adverse cardiovascular events, with every 1% decrease in FMD associated with a 12% increase in risk.

“Therefore, regular ingestion of curcumin could be a preventive measure against cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women,” they wrote.

“Furthermore, our results suggest that curcumin may be a potential alternative […] for patients who are unable to exercise.”

Benefits

Curcumin, the natural pigment that gives the spice turmeric its yellow color, has increasingly come under the scientific spotlight in recent years, with studies investigating its potential health benefits.

The new study suggests that endothelial function may also be added to the list of potential benefits from curcumin.

Endothelial health is gaining more visibility with the product formulation community. One of the sessions at the recent IFT show in Las Vegas in June focused on the category as a possible avenue for new health claims.

A recent article by NutraIngredients-USA discussed the potential of the market and how to communicate the benefits to consumers.

Study details

Researchers from the University of Tsukuba recruited 32 post-menopausal women and assigned them to one of three groups: The first group acted as the controls, the second group underwent an aerobic exercise training regime, and the third group received curcumin supplements (Theracurmin from Theravalues Corporation, Tokyo).

The curcumin used in the study was described as a “highly absorptive curcumin dispersed with colloidal nanoparticles”. A daily dose of 25 milligrams was provided.

The study lasted for eight weeks, after which the results showed that FMD increased significantly and equally by about 1.5% in both the exercise and curcumin groups, compared with no changes in the control group.

“The mechanism responsible for the curcumin ingestion induced improvement in endothelial function is unclear,” said the researchers.

“Curcumin exerts anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects by inhibiting tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), suggesting that its effect on endothelial function may be mediated by the suppression of inflammation and/or oxidative stress via down-regulation of TNF-alpha. However, TNF-alpha levels were mot assessed in this study.

“Further studies are warranted to clarify the mechanism underlying the effect of curcumin on endothelial function.”

The study was funded by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science.

Source: 
Nutrition Research

Marco Torres is a research specialist, writer and consumer advocate for healthy lifestyles. He holds degrees in Public Health and Environmental Science and is a professional speaker on topics such as disease prevention, environmental toxins and health policy.

Find out more at: Prevent Disease 

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Turmeric Repairs Damaged Liver Tissues, Promotes Overall Liver Health

Turmeric Repairs Damaged Liver Tissues, Promotes Overall Liver Health

by Elizabeth Renter,

Turmeric, it gives curries their smoky, pungent taste and gorgeous yellow hue. But this root is far more than just tasty—it’s one of the most valuable plant-based medicines in existence. Research has connected turmeric to a variety of wonderful benefits, including and especially the promotion of liver health.

The Role of Turmeric in Restoring the Liver

According to a new study in the Journal of the Medical Association of Thailand,  scientists there have found that the livers of diabetic rats were repaired and even regenerated with the help of this yellow power-root.

Severe diabetics often suffer liver damage and disease as they progress. But, research indicates turmeric may be able to help.

“Fascinatingly, liver microvasculature in curcumin treated group developed into regenerate and repair into healthy and normal characteristics.” They concluded: “These results optimistically demonstrated the potential use of curcumin as a novel therapeutic agent in liver pathology of diabetic rats.”

What is it about turmeric that makes it so great? It’s the compound known as curcumin. And curcumin has long been connected to liver health. Numerous studies have linked it to effectively combating liver cancer and improving liver fibroids. What’s more, turmeric can uniquely assist the enzymes that are responsible for flushing out known dietary carcinogens. The result is enhanced protection against liver damage, and even regeneration of affected liver cells. Turmeric is also notably responsible for improving the health of the gallbladder as well.

In relation to diabetes, there are countless studies, as shown in this chart from GreenMedInfo.com, that link curcumin and the treatment of diabetes-related problems. This includes the benefits of turmeric related to liver disease, kidney function, diabetic retinopathy, cataracts, bone density, diabetes prevention, and diabetic neuropathies.

The list of benefits doesn’t stop there—turmeric has also been shown to be able to fight Alzheimer’s disease. Experts believe the lower incidence of this disease in Middle Eastern populations could be credited to the higher consumption of turmeric.

Melnoma, breast cancer, lung cancer, neck cancer, and of course liver cancer, may all be helped with turmeric. It can also, reportedly, make cells more vulnerable to cancer treatments.

It’s an anti-inflammatory as well. This property means curcumin can help with things like arthritis, eczema, allergies, digestive problems and skin issues. It’s an antiviral, antifungal, and antibacterial agent.

Reaping the benefits of turmeric and curcumin is simple: start eating it! Curries are a great way to get plenty of this super-root, and curries are very versatile. But, if Caribbean or Middle-Eastern cuisine isn’t your thing: add it to soups and sprinkle it on vegetables. For more on what this spice is capable of, check out some other awesome turmeric uses.

Additional Sources:

The Telegraph

Read more: http://naturalsociety.com/turmeric-repairs-damaged-liver-tissues-promotes-liver-health/#ixzz2AdG0ncsD

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Turmeric Prevents One of The Most Malignant Cancers In The World

Turmeric Prevents One of The Most Malignant Cancers In The World

by Marco Torres

Powdered turmeric has been used for centuries to treat a host of illnesses. Its active ingredient, curcumin, inhibits inflammatory reactions, has anti-diabetic effects, reduces cholesterol among other powerful health effects. A new study led by a research team at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat (LMU) in Munich now shows that it can also inhibit formation of metastases.

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One of the most comprehensive summaries of a review of 700 turmeric studies to date was published by the respected ethnobotanist James A. Duke, Phd. He showed that turmeric appears to outperform many pharmaceuticals in its effects against several chronic, debilitating diseases, and does so with virtually no adverse side effects.

Cancer is no exception. Prostate cancer is one of the most prevalent malignancies in the Western world, and is often diagnosed only after metastatic tumors have formed in other organs. In three percent of cases, these metastases are lethal. A research team led by PD Dr. Beatrice Bachmeier at LMU Munich has been studying the mode of action of a natural product that inhibits the formation of metastases. The compound is found in turmeric, a plant that has been used for medicinal purposes for thousands of years, and is a major ingredient of curry.

Duke noted that in the handbook Phytochemicals: Mechanisms of Action, curcumin and/or turmeric were effective in animal models in prevention and/or treatment of colon cancer, mammary cancer, prostate cancer, murine hepato-carcinogenesis (liver cancer in rats), esophageal cancer, and oral cancer. 

Bachmeier’s research centers on curcumin, the polyphenol responsible for the characteristic color of curry. Curcumin is well tolerated and is therefore, in principle, suitable both for prophylactic use (primary prevention) and also for the suppression of metastases in cases where an established tumor is already present (secondary prevention). In a previous study Bachmeier and her colleagues had demonstrated that the substance reduces statistically significantly the formation of lung metastases in an animal model of advanced breast cancer.

Mitigating metastasis The new study was designed to investigate the efficacy of curcumin in the prevention of prostate cancer metastases, and to determine the agent’s mechanism of action. The researchers first examined the molecular processes that are abnormally regulated in prostate carcinoma cells. Breast and prostate cancers are often associated with latent or chronic inflammatory reactions, and in both cases, the tumor cells were found to produce pro-inflammatory immunomodulators including the cytokines CXCL1 und CXCL2.

The researchers went on to show that curcumin specifically decreases the expression of these two proteins, and in a mouse model, this effect correlated with a decline in the incidence of metastases. “Due to the action of curcumin, the tumor cells synthesize smaller amounts of cytokines that promote metastasis,” says Bachmeier. “As a consequence, the frequency of metastasis formation in the lungs is significantly reduced, in animals with breast cancer, as we showed previously, or carcinoma of the prostate, as demonstrated in our new study.”

Curcumin and chemoprevention Bachmeier therefore believes that curcumin may be useful in the prevention of breast and prostate cancers — which are both linked to inflammation — and in reducing their metastatic potential. “This does not mean that the compound should be seen as a replacement for conventional therapies. However, it could play a positive role in primary prevention — before a full-blown tumor arises — or help to avert formation of metastases. In this context the fact that the substance is well tolerated is very important, because one can safely recommend it to individuals who have an increased tumor risk.”

A daily intake of up to 8g of curcumin is regarded as safe, and its anti-inflammatory properties have long been exploited in traditional oriental medicine. Men with benign hyperplasia of the prostate (BHP) are one possible target group for prophylaxis, as are women who have a family history of breast cancer. The agent might also be valuable as a supplement to certain cancer therapies. At all events, curcumin’s beneficial effects must first be confirmed in controlled clinical tests. Bachmeier is now planning such a trial in patients who suffer from therapy-resistant carcinoma of the prostate.

Marco Torres is a research specialist, writer and consumer advocate for healthy lifestyles. He holds degrees in Public Health and Environmental Science and is a professional speaker on topics such as disease prevention, environmental toxins and health policy.

This article first appeared in Prevent Disease 

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